Excerpt from Your Inner Gold: Transform Your Life and Discover Your Soul's Purpose


            Dreams originate in deep, expanded realms of our consciousness. Since this is so foreign to many of us, what we remember of our dreams are snippets, edited by our egos which lead us to doubt the value of our dreams. When we dismiss the very real importance of dream symbology and messages, we sacrifice valuable information that we need to be whole. We downplay this important part of life in order to be accepted as “normal.” In the ABC television series, Eli Stone, a deity figure, played by Sigourney Weaver, tells Eli that by avoiding his spiritual calling by longing to be “normal” is just another word for sloth, which, she says, is a failure of potential.     

             Dreams teach us that our own personal symbology is related to archetypal, or universal, symbology. A book on symbology and archetypes is more helpful than books that propose to interpret dream symbols because all they do is offer the same meaning for all. I recommend combining universal symbology with what you gather as personal symbols as the best way to understand your dreams and their messages. You can also apply this symbology to your everyday life because there is actually no difference between dream reality and ordinary reality…they are merely extensions of one another in different forms. Many times we’ll dream about something that happened that day but the dream scenario looks so different from the daytime reality that we miss the connection. We also miss how the dream shows us more about the daytime experience that we otherwise might miss.

            Using this combined approach will build your confidence in your ability to interpret your life experiences in the same way as you do your dreams. You’ll learn that common dream symbols like fire or water, for instance, usually refer to emotions, change, resistance, flow of energy or lack of it. An example might be in a dream you have of being swept away in a raging river. Generally, water represents emotion, change, or spirit, so for you, it might symbolize the loss of something that you’ve held dear, whether it’s a person, job, or way of thinking and being and how you feel about that loss or change. Your river dream would be a Dissolution dream because it involves water that you cannot control and that takes you to another place in consciousness. Another example is a dream in which something of importance to you is being destroyed by fire as in Calcination, which burns away that which we ignore or refuse to deal with and that may present as ongoing anger. In a Calcination dream, the fire burns and you are given the opportunity in the dream to resolve the chronic anger by looking at what the burning object means to you symbolically. It could be that your apartment is on fire and could possibly mean that you really don’t want to be living there and haven’t taken any steps to remedy the problem—thus the fire represents your anger at yourself and your indecision.